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16 May

#Menopause&SPORT - VIDEO Where to begin with weights with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Resistance work to build bone density in menopause

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
20 May

#RUNNING - ♀VIDEO Couch to 5k with .@ActiveDevon

13:00 Get running in Devon and support

14:00

Active Devon supports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' to help get more women & girls, more ACTIVE!

WSNet works with partners to cover and promote Women's Sport worldwide

Couch to 5k beginner running group - you can too!

Active Devon is based in Devon and have created a Couch to 5k beginner running group. Active Devon work with community partners to find innovative ways of achieving its vision of Everyone in Devon Active for Life.  Their video features a group of women from Bowhill Primary School in Exeter who all successfully completed the 9 week Couch to 5k beginner runner programme. The community running group was created by Active Devon and Exeter City Football in the Community as a result of consultation with the school to try and catch the imaginations of some of the inactive parents. The women give us their funny and candid stories of why they joined and what they have gained through completing the programme. 

Why not join in? Follow them on Twitter: @ActiveDevon 

Promote your WomensSports video on #WSNetTV - send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

 

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
20 May

#RUNNING - VIDEO problems from Achilles Tendonitis? - exercise via @SundialClinic

13:00 Great stretches for running & better movement

14:00

The Sundial Clininc supports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' to help get more women & girls, more ACTIVE!
(This article is for guidance only. You should also seek medical advcie if you have concerns about injury.)

Stretching may help reduce injury and improve flexibility in runners. Most runners include stretches in their routine. It is important to prepare your muscles for a run by gently warming up and keep flexible by doing these stretches. These exercises put together by our physio can help stretch the main running muscles.

These stretches should be held for over 30 seconds – don’t rush. Aim to do these exercises once a day although doing them twice a day is three times as beneficial. Stay relaxed and breathe out as you develop the stretch. Develop the stretches gently to avoid overstretching and injuring yourself.

The 3 stretches we recommend for running are: hamstring, hip flexor and calf and here is how to do these.

You can download the stretches for running for free here VBHM stretches

Hamstring stretch

Dynamic hamstring stretch

Sets three each side

Hold 30 to 60 seconds

  • straighten one leg, grabbed the back of your thigh and target your leg towards your chest until you feel a gentle stretch.
  • Bend your leg at the knee slightly coming off the stretch
  • repeat by pushing your heel towards the ceiling
  • alternate your legs

Note: avoid kicking violently or arching your lower back

If it’s shaking your doing it well!

Hip flexor stretch

Hip flexor stretch

Sets three each side

Hold 30 to 60 seconds

  • hands on hips, tuck your tailbone under to flat on your back
  • lean forwards while maintaining a straight posture and keeping your head up
  • avoid arching your low back or letting your hips roll forwards

Note: do it next to a wall if you feel out of balance

Calf stretch

Hip flexor stretch

Sets three each side

Hold 30 to 60 seconds

  • have front toes and knee touching the wall
  • move your foot back a little until you can just about keep your knee against the wall and heel on the floor
  • hold
  • Move the back foot away from the wall to feel a stretch
  • keep back heel on the ground and knee straight as possible
  • hold
  • swap legs

For more information please contact the Sundial Clinic, Brighton

Why not join in? Follow them on Twitter: @SundialClinic

Promote your WomensSports video on #WSNetTV - send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

 

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
20 May

#HerMoJo VIDEO Getting ACTIVE over 50 with .@FaithDeyFitness & .@Her_MoJo

13:00 - Exercising & Conditioning for Women Over 50 : Getting Fit

14:00

Faith Dey at EHow supports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' to help get more women & girls, more ACTIVE!

  • Exercises for women over 50 are very important if you include strength training. Learn about exercising and conditioning for women over 50 with help from a nationally recognized fitness specialist in this free video clip.
  • Expert: Faith Dey        Filmmaker: Vincent Buckley
  • Series Description: Getting fit and staying that way doesn't have to drain your wallet with expensive equipment purchases or gym memberships. Find out how to get fit at home or even at work with help from a nationally recognized fitness specialist in this free video series.

More info: faithdeyfitness.com  Twitter: @FaithDeyFitness 

Promote your WomensSports video on #WSNetTV - send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
21 May

#RUNNING VIDEO - 5 TOP TIPS when you start running VIA: .@CatyCulp

13:00 - Gear, Apps, Diet, Plans & Recovery for beginners plus choosing a sports bra!

14:00

Caty Culp supports #HerMoJo - Five things i wish i knew before I started running!

Running can simultaneously sound like a walk in the park… and also incredibly daunting. I’ve been running off and on for a couple years now, and I feel like I’ve only JUST found my groove with running. In this video, I share with you 5 running tips for beginners, aka, 5 things I wish I knew about running from the beginning. If you don't know how to start running, this video is for you. Whether you’re training for your first 5k, looking for the perfect running shoes, on the hunt for running apps that you’ll actually use, or just looking for general running tips, I’ve got you covered in this video all about running for beginners!

Why not join in? Follow her on Twitter: @CathyCulp

Need advice on sports bras? - Look here - SportsBRA

Promote your WomensSports video on #WSNetTV - send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
21 May

#Menopause&SPORT - VIDEO Workout for your Menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - choose the right workout for your Menopause

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Picture credit (C) - PowerhoopUK

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
21 May

#HERMoJo - ♀ VIDEO Kettlebell Workout for Beginners via .@blogilates .@againstbc

13:00 Beginner's kettlebell workout - do it at home!

14:00

Blogilates supports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' to help get more women & girls, more ACTIVE!

Your kettlebell home workout.

Cassey from Blogilates and Rosa from http://www.Rocofit.com teach you a beginner's kettlebell workout! If you don't have a kettlebell, you can just use a dumbbell! Cassey Ho is a certified Pilates and fitness instructor, winner of YouTube Next Trainer, and was also recently named FITNESS Magazine's Best Healthy Living Blogger.  MORE  www.blogilates.com/

So why not join in? Keep active during the Coronavirus outbreak.

Promote your video on #WSNetTV Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise/coaching programmes.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJowww.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

 

 

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
23 May

#Menopause&SPORT - Focus on flexibility & mobility with weights with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Mobility is key to movement, menopause & weight loss

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Photo credit (C) Ben Lister

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
24 May

#HWomeninSPORT VIDEO - @MariaShriver on importance of sports and success after @EYWomenAthletes

13:00 Watch Maria Shriver on Women in Sport

13:00

Journalist and activist Maria Shriver explains why many women who are great leaders once played sports

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
26 May

#Menstruation&SPORT - VIDEO Menstruation & SmartHER Athlete WITH: .@ezross .@eis2win

13:00 - SmartHER: Female Athlete Health @ the EIS

14:00

SmartHER: Female Athlete Health @ the English Institute of Sport is supported by WSNet's HerMoJo programme
 

Emma Ross and Richard Burden of the EIS Physiology team speak about the work they are doing around female athlete health to encourage athletes, coaches and support staff to open up the conversation and consider female physiology and psychology in training, recovery, nutrition and the coaching environment, in order to improve the health and performance outcomes for female athletes.

Read more about Menstruation & training - extract from MoJoManuals - helping teen girls enjoy competitive sport by overcoming some of the many issues they face!

Work around your period - when you are training regularly be aware that exercise is good but the type and timing are important. You might want to track your cycle on a smart phone APP. This can help you plan training/diet and have a better understanding of what’s happening.

High oestrogen - rising levels of the hormone oestrogen in the first half of your cycle help energise you and can help you feel ready to train hard. As oestrogen levels increase, some experts suggest that this is good time to do strength and resistance training. Eating carbohydrates
and proteins are particularly important as these provide energy and help with recovery.

Second half of your cycle - as the hormone progesterone kicks in, and then towards the end of your period, levels of both progesterone and oestrogen fall. You might begin to feel a little sluggish. Some experts say this is the time to focus more on endurance and reduce the intensity of your training. Your body is thought to use fats more at this time to provide energy, so try and get some good healthy fats into your diet. 

Read more about HerMoJo HERE - Buy/Download your digitalcopy HERE - prices from1 Euro

"HerMoJo - Empowerment, Inner strength & outer confidence, combined with the resilience to overcome fear of judgement in sport . . . and the ability to grow that confidence into everyday life to become a stronger more empowered women." Find out more . . . HERE!

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
26 May

#NETBALLMoJo VIDEO - Develop the Universal Athletic Position with .@nettyheads

13:00 - find your UAP with Nick from The Youth Academy

14:00

The Universal Athletic Position allows for efficiency of movement. Join Nick to learn more about this position and its relationship to Netball. Nettyheads are coaching specialists in NSW, Australia.

Corrective exercise and performance enhancement specialists consider this position vital to athletic movement. All athletes, no matter the sport, should learn this stance.

“Being proficient with this setup is a necessity for athletes to reach their full athletic potential,” According to Drew Walsh from 'Dick's Sporting goods. Walsh says. “If proper mechanics are overlooked, we then create poor habits and movement patterns.”

HOW TO GET INTO THE UNIVERSAL ATHLETIC POSITION

Begin by standing in an athletic stance with your feet slightly outside your shoulders. Attempt to evenly distribute your weight through your midfoot. Once you’re in position, follow these steps:

  • Drive your hips straight back. Your chest should lean slightly forward.
  • Bend your knees until your shoulders are in line with your toes.
  • Fully extend your arms, aligning them with your torso.
  • Bring your shoulder blades down and back.
  • Hold this position while maintaining a flat back. Remember to shift your weight through your midfoot.

Walsh notes that understanding the universal athletic position can lead to more advanced, intricate movements to further your training. “Once this setup is mastered, athletes can progress to more complex movements to maximize transfer to all strength training, movement mechanics and sports-specific tasks, while also enhancing performance and helping to reduce risk of injury,” he says.

WSNet & NETBALLMoJo 

  • WSNet's work in Africa - HERE
  • International Netball Federation - #CreatingChoices programme - HERE
  • NETBALLMoJo - written by key contributors around the world is designed to help girls overcome many of the issues they face in both western and 'third world' communities starting out in netball. More info  Order you copy here - www.wsnet.co.uk/netballmojo
  • Netball Australia Knee P:rogramme - https://knee.netball.com.au/junior/

International – we’re currently working to get NETBALLMoJo translated (into Zulu, Xhosa, Swahili etc.) and digitised. Keen to work with UK NGBs and International Federations to help get the ‘Empowerment through Sport’ message across. Digital editions can be distributed virtually free (e.g. 50 Rupees) and delivered directly, circumventing local (often misogynistic) prejudices – we believe that gives WSNet a unique momentum that can really change the lives of girls in both western and 'third world' countries. If you can help please email paul.r@wsnet.co.uk with your interest.

Background to Women’s Sports Network

Is a self-funded, cooperative network of groups and individuals working independently as associates and part-time volunteers. It is a not-for-profit community approaching one hundred thousand worldwide. Crystallising the issues & coordinating opportunities around WomenSport & Fitness by working in partnership with commercial/NGBs/educational/Charity organisations to raise the profile of WomenSport & SportsWomen. Advocating better access to Sport/FITNess, alleviating gender-bias and empowering women & girls through sport & fitness in their everyday lives.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
28 May

#NordicWALKING - VIDEO - 5 TOP TIPS getting into Nordic walking via .@nordicwalkinguk

13:00 - Get into the swing of Nordic! @BristolNordicWa

14:00

The FIVE 5 TOP TIPS getting into Nordic walking

Whether you want to shed a few pounds, increase your fitness, protect your joints or simply have a fun sociable walk, Nordic walking ticks all the boxes.  It may not be as trendy as running or cycling but it offers much more of a total body workout and is truly something that will help keep you fit and active for the rest of your life.

Benefits of Nordic walking.
1.  It’s enjoyable – and anyone can be good at it
There are many things in life that we have to do because we are told to or ought to.  Exercise should not be one of them.  Nordic walking is simply a good walk made doubly effective by adding poles and clever technique and enjoyment is a key benefit for our Nordic walkers.  Exercising in the fresh air; the feeling of fitness and wellbeing it gives them; the places it takes them to; the people they meet; the non-competitive nature of it; and the ability to be good at it even (especially) if you’re not the ‘sporty’ type are part what makes Nordic walking so unique.
2.  Helps with weight loss
Nordic walking is energy thirsty.  In our research project carried out last year walkers burnt up to 45% more calories Nordic walking than ordinary walking (the average was 15%).  Other research records similar gains.  This is because Nordic walking brings many more muscles into play than ordinary walking – your chest, arms, shoulders, abs and other core muscles are all involved as well as your legs.  Plus the poles propel you forwards helping you walk faster, raising your heart rate and expending energy.
3.  Tones your muscles and helps keep your bones strong
Muscles need to be worked to stay in good shape and Nordic walking works over 90% of them. Public Health England recently specifically recommended Nordic walking as a muscle and bone strengthening and balance activity.  It tones your legs, sculpts your arms, cinches your waist and tightens your core.  Its weightbearing nature and the added resistance provided by the poles also helps improve bone health and strength.
4.  Protects your hip and knee joints
Those of our walkers with sore hips or knees frequently tell us how good Nordic walking is for easing the stress on their lower body.  Research supports this.  In one trial comparing the forces on joints when Nordic walking vs ordinary walking on the flat, there was an overall reduction in the sheer and compression forces on the hip and knee joints and an astonishing 28% reduction on the shear force at the knee.   It was not just hips and knees, the lumber spine and ankles also benefited.  Improved posture through Nordic walking as well as taking some of the load off the lower body through the poles clearly benefits joints.
5.  Strengthens your heart and lungs and benefits those with asthma
Nordic walking gets your heart rate up.  Much more so than regular walking.  Our research showed an increase of up to 33 beats per minute when walking on the flat.  It also makes you puffed because you’re walking faster and using more muscles.  The benefits of exercise for your heart and lungs are well documented.  Amongst other things it helps lower blood pressure, reduces your risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes and keeps your arteries clear.
Asthma sufferers who have started Nordic walking with us have seen great improvements.  Here’s what Heather has to say: “Signing-up as a member for two sessions a week, I quickly started to notice the health benefits: improved fitness; less breathlessness; an improvement in my walking and posture; and an overall sense of achievement…My asthma has receded to the extent that I no longer use steroid or reliever inhalers and although not confirmed by my GP yet, I feel it has resolved. I am not afraid of the challenge of exercise; I now embrace it.”
6.  Boosts your circulation
All exercise (if done at a sufficiently intense level) improves circulation because it increases the rate at which blood is pumped round the body.  However Nordic walking is additionally beneficial.  The technique encourages active feet, a full arm swing, and squeezing and opening the hands round the pole.  All of which boosts circulation, particularly the efficient return of blood back to the heart. 
7.  Improves your lymph drainage
The lymphatic system is hugely important.  It helps to protect us from infection and disease and is a vital part of our immune system.  We have clusters of lymph nodes all over our body including under our armpits and Nordic walking helps these in particular to function properly through its emphasis on good posture, correct breathing and a full arm swing.
8.  Mental wellbeing
Exercise helps reduce stress and anxiety and it’s even more effective when done in a green environment. No surprises here - nature is intrinsically good for the spirit. Not only is Nordic walking outdoors, it’s also a social activity – another stress buster, mood enhancer, and friendship creator.  You’re literally and metaphorically moving forwards.
9.  Visit new places
Whether it’s new parks and walks locally or trips further afield, Nordic walking is a gateway for exploring.  The poles provide support and the technique promotes good posture giving you the confidence and stamina to tackle challenges that you’d never thought possible.  

Not every sport suits everyone but walking is hard-wired into our DNA and Nordic walking adds a mighty turbo-boost. 

How to Nordic Walk - CLICK - 5 EASY STEPS

Why not join in? Follow them on Twitter: @BristolNordicWa

Promote your WomensSports video on #WSNetTV - send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
28 May

#HerMoJo ♀VIDEO - Why Women/Girls have more ACL injuries VIA: Player Fitness & Performance

13:00 - Six ACL recovery exercises

14:00

Players Fitness & Performance supports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' to help get more women & girls, more ACTIVE!

ACL recovery programme for women & girls. Scroll for all six videos.

#1 Anatomical Makeup

The Q-Angle is the relationship between the hips and knees. It is more pronounced in females because their hips are designed to be child-bearing.

Unfortunately, this angle from the hip to the knee puts girls at much higher risk for tearing their ACL and having other knee injuries.
But, fear not...there are solutions and injury prevention modalities you can learn below.
 
#2 Flexibility and Mobility
 
In a lot of ways, girls are more flexible than guys. It is a good thing for moany girls have hypermobile knees for example, which gives them the ability to hyperextend their knees. Again, not a good thing when it comes to jumping (I.E. netball players) or even accelerating from a stopped position (I.E. a lacrosse player attacking a ball after the draw).

 

 
Again, there are viable solutions every female athlete can do to strengthen the knees and counteract some of the unnecessary mobilities and flexibilities they have.
  
#3 Hormonal Changes 
 
Research shows that the hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle can put them at a higher risk of injury. Check our article on training & menstruation. Now you know why, and you are asking yourself, “How can I give my daughter the best chance of AVOIDING the season and possible career ending ACL Tear?”

There are 6 exercises every female athlete should be doing year round to keep their knees resilient and injury-free.
 
Most of them they can do on their own with little to no equipment.
 
1) Clam Shell - WATCH on YouTube

This exercise will strengthen the glutes big time, which are the top muscles that stop the knee from caving in. The motion works directly against the inward force that causes ACL injuries.

 
2) Double Leg Bridge w/mini band - WATCH on YouTube

This exercise has multiple benefits. It is going to make you a lot faster, plus it will strengthen hamstrings AND glutes to further stabilize knee and hips.

 
3) Single Leg Step Behind - WATCH on YouTube

This one looks 10X easier than it is. To truly go all the way down and up, without the knee caving in and without pushing off the bottom pad, requires a ton of strength from the quads, hamstrings, and glutes. This one builds off the previous two.

 
4) Hex Bar Deadlift- 2-3 sets of 5-7 reps in-season - WATCH on You Tube

The hex bar allows athletes to achieve the optimal deadlift position without putting their lower back at risk (opposed to a barbell deadlift). This exercise not only reinforces all of the muscles and movements from above, but it is a total body exercise that also incorporates a lot of upper body. Highly effective for performance and ACL prevention when done correctly.

  
5) Mini Band Side Steps- 2-3 sets of 10 reps in-season - WATCH on YouTube

This one works the athlete in movement. Most ACL injuries come from cutting and changing direction. By doing the stationary side steps first, you are priming the body to withstand the knee from diving in when you go to plant and cut. 

 
6) Single leg box jump stick - WATCH on YouTube

This is the highest level of difficulty of the six exercises, which means it is also the most effective and beneficial when done correctly. You will want to build up to this one, starting out with double leg jumps and landings before progressing to single leg. A female athletes ability to decelerate and keep the knee from wiggling is KEY to preventing ACL injury.

You can do a few of these exercises on your own with zero equipment. Make sure you are doing them correctly and with control.  More from Player's Fitness & Performance - HERE

So why not join in? Keep active during the Coronavirus outbreak.

Promote your video on #WSNetTV Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

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30 May

#MenoMoJo - VIDEO Caffeine and your Menopause - .@MayoClinic

13:00 - How does caffeine affect your menopause?

14:00

Does drinking caffiene affect your menopause?

Dr. Stephanie Faubion discusses a Mayo Clinic study, published by the journal Menopause, which found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. The study also showed an association between caffeine intake and fewer problems with mood, memory and concentration in perimenopausal women, possibly because caffeine is known to enhance arousal, mood and attention. This is the largest study to date on caffeine and menopausal symptoms.

Drinking caffeine may worsen the hot flashes and night sweats that affect roughly two-thirds of women as they go through menopause, new survey data suggests.
"While these findings are preliminary, our study suggests that limiting caffeine intake may be useful for those postmenopausal women who have bothersome hot flashes and night sweats," said researcher Dr. Stephanie Faubion, director of the Women's Health Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Mi

But caffeine -- a stimulant found in coffee and colas -- appears to have a different effect on women beginning the transition into menopause (known as perimenopause). In their case, caffeine might boost their mood, memory and concentration, the survey suggested.
The findings, published online July 23 in the journal Menopause, stem from a Mayo Clinic poll of more than 1,800 menopausal women conducted between 2005 and 2011. Symptoms were compared between caffeine users and nonusers.

Read more - HERE

MenoMoJoTV - find yours, follow us (@MenoMoJoTV) for daily updates on new videos supporting you & your menopause - Advice, support & guidance. A joint initiative by The Women's Sports Network in partnership with Menopause Matters magazine (@menomatters) supporting women in being more ACTIVE during their menopause.

Your Video on @MMTV - Free to our 100k followers!!

If you would like your MenoVideo to appear on MMTV – please submit a link to Katie on info@wsnet.co.uk and we will distribute it to our 100k followers at no charge.

 

 

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31 May

#Menopause&SPORT - VIDEO Stretching through Menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Stretching you and your menopause

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

<ahref='https://www.freepik.com/photos/woman'>Woman photo created by freepik - www.freepik.com</a>

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