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02 Aug

#Menopause&SPORT - VIDEO Core strength for you Menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Stretch to improve balance and stability in menopause

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
03 Aug

#HERMoJo - VIDEO Do schools kill creativity? Sir Ken Robinson .@Her_MoJo

13:00 - entertaining and profoundly moving case for education that nurtures creativity

14:00

TedTalks supports #ACTIV8afriend - a gentle 'nudge' every month to help getmore women more ACTIVE!

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity. A must watch if you are r a coach sports /PE teacher or just want to hear some sense on the rlationship between the Sciences and the Humanities.

Sir Kenneth Robinson (born 4 March 1950) is a British author, speaker and international advisor on education in the arts to government, non-profits, education and arts bodies. He was Director of the Arts in Schools Project (1985–89) and Professor of Arts Education at the University of Warwick (1989–2001), and is now Professor Emeritus at the same institution. In 2003 he was knighted for services to art.

Promote your video on #ACTIV8TV. Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk, your Twitter @Handle and some info about your club/class. 

Follow @WSN_TV on Twitter for exclusive alerts and links to every programme - watch on your smart device!

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

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05 Aug

#RUNNING - ♀ VIDEO get your daughter running with .@minimermaiduk .@runninggirl101

13:00 After school programmes for running girls

13:00

Mini Mermaidupports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' to help get more women & girls, more ACTIVE! 

After school programmes for young girls
We run an after school programme for girls aged 5 - 11, and a mentorship programme in High School, aimed at promoting self esteem, confidence and a sense of self worth whilst giving girls a chance to fall in love with running and exercise.

MORE from http://www.minimermaiduk.com/

For more updates follow @minimermaiduk

So why not join in? 

Promote your story/video on #WSNews/TV - Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme, research or sports stories from around the world.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals (16)

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

#FemaleFreindly Clubs/Classes in @WomenSportsWeek on @ACTIVEMapX

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
06 Aug

#Menopause&SPORT - VIDEO High Vs Low Impact Exercise for the menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Hi or Low IMPACT in menopause? Which do you choose?

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
09 Aug

#MotorSPORT VIDEO - Women in Motorcycling

13:00 Women in Motorcycling

14:00

The FIM (WWW.FIM-LIVE.COM) founded in 1904, is the world governing body for motorcycle sport and the global advocate for motorcycling. The FIM is an independent association formed by 108 National Federations throughout the world. It is recognized as the sole competent authority in motorcycle sport by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Among its 50 FIM World Championships the main events are MotoGP, Superbike, Endurance, Motocross, Supercross, Trial, Enduro, Cross-Country Rallies and Speedway. Furthermore, the FIM is also active and involved in the following areas: public affairs, road safety, touring and protection of the environment.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
11 Aug

#NETBALLMoJo - ♀ VIDEO Ballwork drill for U10s - @Nettyheads

12:00 Caterpillar Drill for your u10s

22:00

Nettyheads supports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' to help get more women & girls, more ACTIVE!

This Caterpillar Drill is the ideal ballwork drill for your u10 yrs netball players !! 

Nettyheads is an Australian netball training organisation. Nettyheads provides a platform through coaching and mentoring programs, for young girls to shape their learning, enjoyment, and love of sport. With the ultimate aim to produce capable netballers and quality people.

Follow them on Instagram: @nettyheads
Like them on Facebook: Nettyheads

So why not join them? Keep active during the Coronavirus outback.

Promote your video on #WSNetTV Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
14 Aug

#Menopause&SPORT - Core Strength fitness for Menopause with weights with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Find your core strength and deal with Menopause

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
16 Aug

#MenoMoJo VIDEO - Coping with the Menopause by being ACTIVE with Katie Morris & .@menomatters

13:00 - reduce symptoms, find energy & confidence & love what you see in the mirror"

14:00

Stretching through Menopause - Katie Morris takes you through some of her great stretching and postural routines to help as we age.

A basic stretch routine that can be done in the morning of before bed to reduce menopausal symptoms, find more energy, regain confidence & love what you see in the mirror

One of the most popular questions I am asked as a coach is should we be stretching more as we age? Are there benefits or is it a waste of time? Find out what I have to say in this short video, and stay tuned until the end as I give you a bonus full body stretching routine that can be done every day to help improve your flexibility and therefore reduce aches and pains in the long term.

Try Katie's routine - each day for 15 mins - more info from Menopause Matters

Contact Katie - kmofituk@gmail.com

MenoMoJoTV - find yours, follow us (@MenoMoJoTV) for daily updates on new videos supporting you & your menopause - Advice, support & guidance. A joint initiative by The Women's Sports Network in partnership with Menopause Matters magazine (@menomatters) supporting women in being more ACTIVE during their menopause.

Your Video on @MMTV - Free to our 100k followers!!

If you would like your MenoVideo to appear on MMTV – please submit a link to Katie on info@wsnet.co.uk and we will distribute it to our 100k followers at no charge.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
20 Aug

#MenoMoJo - VIDEO Caffeine and your Menopause - .@MayoClinic

13:00 - How does caffeine affect your menopause?

14:00

Does drinking caffiene affect your menopause?

Dr. Stephanie Faubion discusses a Mayo Clinic study, published by the journal Menopause, which found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. The study also showed an association between caffeine intake and fewer problems with mood, memory and concentration in perimenopausal women, possibly because caffeine is known to enhance arousal, mood and attention. This is the largest study to date on caffeine and menopausal symptoms.

Drinking caffeine may worsen the hot flashes and night sweats that affect roughly two-thirds of women as they go through menopause, new survey data suggests.
"While these findings are preliminary, our study suggests that limiting caffeine intake may be useful for those postmenopausal women who have bothersome hot flashes and night sweats," said researcher Dr. Stephanie Faubion, director of the Women's Health Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Mi

But caffeine -- a stimulant found in coffee and colas -- appears to have a different effect on women beginning the transition into menopause (known as perimenopause). In their case, caffeine might boost their mood, memory and concentration, the survey suggested.
The findings, published online July 23 in the journal Menopause, stem from a Mayo Clinic poll of more than 1,800 menopausal women conducted between 2005 and 2011. Symptoms were compared between caffeine users and nonusers.

Read more - HERE

MenoMoJoTV - find yours, follow us (@MenoMoJoTV) for daily updates on new videos supporting you & your menopause - Advice, support & guidance. A joint initiative by The Women's Sports Network in partnership with Menopause Matters magazine (@menomatters) supporting women in being more ACTIVE during their menopause.

Your Video on @MMTV - Free to our 100k followers!!

If you would like your MenoVideo to appear on MMTV – please submit a link to Katie on info@wsnet.co.uk and we will distribute it to our 100k followers at no charge.

 

 

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
20 Aug

#Menopause&SPORT - VIDEO Where to begin with weights with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Resistance work to build bone density in menopause

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
20 Aug

#Menopause&SPORT How does it affect my #CYCLING? WITH: .@WeAreCyclingUK .@Anna_Glowinski .

13;00 - keep cycling through your peri/menopause

14:00

Can I keep cycling through perimenopause into menopause? What to expect and what might i have to overcome?
 
A down-to-earth chat, aimed at women in cycling. Anna Glowinski, from We Are Cycling (@WeAreCyclingUK) discusses those hot flushes and how to keep cycling during this transformative life stage. Diet, choosing cycling kit, comfy saddles and how to cope with anxiety and any loss of enthusiasm for cycling. How to manage symptoms and what you can expect from your GP.
 
The menopause is when a woman stops having periods and is no longer able to get pregnant naturally. Periods usually start to become less frequent over a few months or years before they stop altogether (perimenopause). Sometimes they can stop suddenly. The menopause is a natural part of ageing that usually occurs between 45 and 55 years of age, as a woman's oestrogen levels decline. In the UK, the average age for a woman to reach the menopause is 51.
 
Anna chats to Dr Susie Unsworth (Cambridge Women's Health), Jesse Lambert-Harden & Mel Berry (Her Spirit - @herspirituk), Emily Barclay (Perimenopausal Hub - @perimenohub), Lesley Wilkinson (Leslie Wilkinson Homeopathy - @WilkinsonLesley) 
 
Follow them on Twitter - more info - click on the organisation's name for a web link:
 
 
Promote your WomenSPORTs video on WSNTV - Promote your story/video/results on WSportsNEWS247 - Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme, research or sports stories from around the world.
 
Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals
 
MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport. (12)

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
22 Aug

#Menopause&SPORT - Focus on flexibility & mobility with weights with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Mobility is key to movement, menopause & weight loss

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Photo credit (C) Ben Lister

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
30 Aug

#Menopause&SPORT - VIDEO Stretching through Menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

13:00 - Stretching you and your menopause

14:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

<ahref='https://www.freepik.com/photos/woman'>Woman photo created by freepik - www.freepik.com</a>

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live

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A round up of latest news

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