WomenSport on WSNetTV

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01 Dec

#NETBALLMoJo ♀VIDEO - Develop the Universal Athletic Position with .@nettyheads

13:00 - find your UAP with Nick from The Youth Academy

13:00

The Universal Athletic Position allows for efficiency of movement. Join Nick to learn more about this position and its relationship to Netball. Nettyheads are coaching specialists in NSW, Australia.

Corrective exercise and performance enhancement specialists consider this position vital to athletic movement. All athletes, no matter the sport, should learn this stance.

“Being proficient with this setup is a necessity for athletes to reach their full athletic potential,” According to Drew Walsh from 'Dick's Sporting goods. Walsh says. “If proper mechanics are overlooked, we then create poor habits and movement patterns.”

HOW TO GET INTO THE UNIVERSAL ATHLETIC POSITION

Begin by standing in an athletic stance with your feet slightly outside your shoulders. Attempt to evenly distribute your weight through your midfoot. Once you’re in position, follow these steps:

  • Drive your hips straight back. Your chest should lean slightly forward.
  • Bend your knees until your shoulders are in line with your toes.
  • Fully extend your arms, aligning them with your torso.
  • Bring your shoulder blades down and back.
  • Hold this position while maintaining a flat back. Remember to shift your weight through your midfoot.

Walsh notes that understanding the universal athletic position can lead to more advanced, intricate movements to further your training. “Once this setup is mastered, athletes can progress to more complex movements to maximize transfer to all strength training, movement mechanics and sports-specific tasks, while also enhancing performance and helping to reduce risk of injury,” he says.

WSNet & NETBALLMoJo 

  • WSNet's work in Africa - HERE
  • International Netball Federation - #CreatingChoices programme - HERE
  • NETBALLMoJo - written by key contributors around the world is designed to help girls overcome many of the issues they face in both western and 'third world' communities starting out in netball. More info  Order you copy here - www.wsnet.co.uk/netballmojo
  • Netball Australia Knee P:rogramme - https://knee.netball.com.au/junior/

International – we’re currently working to get NETBALLMoJo translated (into Zulu, Xhosa, Swahili etc.) and digitised. Keen to work with UK NGBs and International Federations to help get the ‘Empowerment through Sport’ message across. Digital editions can be distributed virtually free (e.g. 50 Rupees) and delivered directly, circumventing local (often misogynistic) prejudices – we believe that gives WSNet a unique momentum that can really change the lives of girls in both western and 'third world' countries. If you can help please email paul.r@wsnet.co.uk with your interest.

Background to Women’s Sports Network

Is a self-funded, cooperative network of groups and individuals working independently as associates and part-time volunteers. It is a not-for-profit community approaching one hundred thousand worldwide. Crystallising the issues & coordinating opportunities around WomenSport & Fitness by working in partnership with commercial/NGBs/educational/Charity organisations to raise the profile of WomenSport & SportsWomen. Advocating better access to Sport/FITNess, alleviating gender-bias and empowering women & girls through sport & fitness in their everyday lives.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
02 Dec

#HerMoJo ♀VIDEO - How Sports Impact the Lives of Women @Sham_Kohestani

13:00: TEDxUNC - Shamila Kohestani - How Sports Impact the Lives of Women

13:00

Shamila Kohestani upports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' to help get more women & girls, more ACTIVE!

The captain of the first women's Afghan national soccer team and recipient of the 2006 Arthur Ashe Courage Award talks about growing up under the Taliban in Afghanistan and the challenges facing women and girls in that environment. Kohestani discusses how playing soccer gave her confidence and courage to fight against oppression of women worldwide.



In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Promote your video on #WSNetTV Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise/coaching programmes.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
04 Dec

#Menopause&SPORT - Where to begin with weights with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

10:00 - Resistance work to build bone density in menopause

11:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
06 Dec

#HERMoJo ♀ GET active whatever your age with .@moveitorloseit1

09:30 Getting active as a mature woman

09:30

MoveIT or LoseIT supports #HerMoJo - Keeping ACTIVE at home during the CoronaPandemic

Move It or Lose It! was founded in 2010 by award-winning fitness expert, Julie Robinson, who has dedicated her career to motivating thousands of people to keep active so they can enjoy healthier, happier lives. 
Through their specialist instructor training programme they now have a national network of fun-filled classes spreading across the UK along with a range of exercise DVDs and resistance bands to keep everyone moving whatever their age or ability.

For more information, check out the website: http://www.moveitorloseit.co.uk

Follow them on Twitter: @moveitorloseit1 - Why not join them? Keep active during the Coronavirus outback.

Promote your video on #WSNetTV - send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise programme.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
10 Dec

#TAKE5 - Women in Motorcycling

13:00 Women in Motorcycling

13:00

The FIM (WWW.FIM-LIVE.COM) founded in 1904, is the world governing body for motorcycle sport and the global advocate for motorcycling. The FIM is an independent association formed by 108 National Federations throughout the world. It is recognized as the sole competent authority in motorcycle sport by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Among its 50 FIM World Championships the main events are MotoGP, Superbike, Endurance, Motocross, Supercross, Trial, Enduro, Cross-Country Rallies and Speedway. Furthermore, the FIM is also active and involved in the following areas: public affairs, road safety, touring and protection of the environment.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
13 Dec

#HerMoJo ♀VIDEO - Whoooosh find you MoJo with a .@PowerhoopUK session

11:00 Get into the swing with Powerhoops

11:00

Powerhoopsupports #HerMoJo - a gentle 'nudge' toSo you want to get into netball.

Fitness League demonstrates one of their brilliant routines - hoops!

  • Lose inches around your waist while having fun in a Powerhoop group exercise class. Our certified instructors are trained to teach exciting, effective classes that give their members fast results. You can find a class in your area at www.powerhoop.com, or ask your local gym to check out the Powerhoop Instructor Training Course.
  • Fitness experts claim that it's impossible to "spot reduce." Powerhoop is proving them wrong.Powerhooping may be fun, but it's a fitness activity that can be taken seriously. A new study by researchers at Canada’s University of Waterloo Spine Biomechanics Laboratory, one of the world's foremost sports medical research facilities, has now confirmed that regular Powerhooping causes the waist to shrink. The subjects were fourteen mildly overweight women who used a Powerhoop for fifteen minutes per day, five days per week, over a period of six weeks. The researchers collected several types of data, including calories burned, subcutaneous fat measurements, subjects’ body measurements and muscle activation.
  • On average, subjects experienced a significant decrease in waist and hip circumference, and waist‐to‐hip ratio. Average reduction in waist size was 3.35 cm, with three of the fourteen subjects losing between 5 and 7.5 cm around the waist. The hips also shrank, but not as much. (The "hourglass shape" was therefore accentuated.
More on Powerhoop HERE & Follow them on Twitter @PowerhoopUK

Promote your video on #WSNetTV Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your exercise/coaching programmes.

Have you seen MoJoManuals? FOOTBALLMoJo, LACROSSEMoJo, ROWMoJo, NETBALLMoJo – www.WSNet.co.uk/MoJoManuals

MoJoManuals addressing the wide range of issues which teenage girls face as they engage in competitive sport. Predicated on 'Physical Literacy' but also cover a range of other emotive issues such as: body image, diet, fit or thin, social media, training with menstruation, coaching style etc. – which impact how girls engage/drop out of sport – and potentially go on to be elite athletes and confident, mature young women outside of sport.

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
13 Dec

#Menopause&SPORT - Workout for your Menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

10:00 - choose the right workout for your Menopause

15:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Picture credit (C) - PowerhoopUK

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
13 Dec

#HERMoJo - ♀ with Marathon Pioneer Kathrine Switzer .@261Fearless

16:15 Katherine Switzer's Boston Marathon Experience16

16:15

261 Fearless supports #ACTIV8afriend - a gentle 'nudge' every month to help get more women more ACTIVE!

Switzer was born in Germany, the daughter of a major in the United States Army. Her family returned to the United States in 1949.[3] She graduated from George C. Marshall High School in Fairfax County, Virginia, then attended Syracuse University, where she studied journalism.She earned a bachelor's degree there in 1968 and a master's degree in 1972.

1967 Boston Marathon
While attending university, Switzer completed the race in 1967 under entry number 261 with the Syracuse Harriers athletic club, five years before women were officially allowed to compete in it. Her finishing time of approximately 4 hours and 20 minutes was nearly an hour behind the first female finisher, Bobbi Gibb (who ran unregistered). She registered under the gender-neutral "K. V. Switzer", which she says was not done to mislead the officials. She says she had long used "K. V. Switzer" to sign the articles she wrote for her university paper. Switzer was issued a number through an "oversight" in the entry screening process, and was treated as an interloper when the error was discovered. Race official Jock Semple attempted to physically remove her from the race. Switzer claims he shouted, "Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers." Switzer's boyfriend Tom Miller, who was running with her, shoved Semple aside and sent him flying, allowing her to proceed. Photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

Afterwards, Boston Athletic Association director Will Cloney was asked his opinion of Switzer competing in the race. Cloney said, "Women can't run in the Marathon because the rules forbid it. Unless we have rules, society will be in chaos. I don't make the rules, but I try to carry them out. We have no space in the Marathon for any unauthorized person, even a man. If that girl were my daughter, I would spank her."

Because of her run, the AAU barred women from all competitions with male runners, violaters to lose the right to compete in any races. Switzer, with other women runners, tried to convince the Boston Athletic Association to allow women to participate in the marathon. Finally, in 1972, women were welcome to run the Boston Marathon officially for the first time ever. Jock Semple, the man who had previously attempted to remove Switzer from the race, was instrumental in this formal admission of female runners.

Later competition and work
Switzer was the women's winner of the 1974 New York City Marathon, with a time of 3:07:29 (59th overall). Her personal best time for the marathon distance is 2:51:37, at Boston in 1975.

Switzer was named Female Runner of the Decade (1967–77) by Runner’s World Magazine and received an Emmy for her work as a television commentator. She wrote Running and Walking for Women over 40 in 1997. She released her memoir, Marathon Woman, in April 2007 on the 40th anniversary of her first running the Boston Marathon. In April 2008, Marathon Woman won the Billie Award for journalism for its inspiring portrayal of women in sports. When visiting the Boston Marathon, Switzer is glad to see other female runners:

'When I go to the Boston Marathon now, I have wet shoulders—women fall into my arms crying. They're weeping for joy because running has changed their lives. They feel they can do anything.'
She was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in 2011 for creating a social revolution by empowering women around the world through running. Since 1967, she has worked to improve running opportunities for women in different parts of the world.

So why not join us? Keep the spirit of @WomenSportsWeek & #ThisGIRLCan alive - #ACTIV8afriend once a month on the 8th! More info HERE - and don't forget our FREE #FemaleFriendly activity-finder - ACTIVEMapX - HERE - 32,000 people are now listed - are you?

Promote your video on #ACTIV8TV? Send a link to jo.c@wsnet.co.uk with some info about your club/class. 

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
14 Dec

#Menopause&SPORT - Core strength for you Menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

10:00 - Stretch to improve balance and stability in menopause

17:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
15 Dec

#Menopause&SPORT - Core Strength fitness for Menopause with weights with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

10:00 - Find your core stregth and deal with Menopause

12:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
15 Dec

#Menopause&SPORT - High Vs Low Impact Exercise for the menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

10:00 - Hi or Low IMPACT in menopause? Which do you choose?

16:30

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
15 Dec

#MenoMoJo - VIDEO Caffeine and your Menopause - .@MayoClinic

13:00 - How does caffeine affect your menopause?

18:00

Does drinking caffiene affect your menopause?

Dr. Stephanie Faubion discusses a Mayo Clinic study, published by the journal Menopause, which found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. The study also showed an association between caffeine intake and fewer problems with mood, memory and concentration in perimenopausal women, possibly because caffeine is known to enhance arousal, mood and attention. This is the largest study to date on caffeine and menopausal symptoms.

Drinking caffeine may worsen the hot flashes and night sweats that affect roughly two-thirds of women as they go through menopause, new survey data suggests.
"While these findings are preliminary, our study suggests that limiting caffeine intake may be useful for those postmenopausal women who have bothersome hot flashes and night sweats," said researcher Dr. Stephanie Faubion, director of the Women's Health Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Mi

But caffeine -- a stimulant found in coffee and colas -- appears to have a different effect on women beginning the transition into menopause (known as perimenopause). In their case, caffeine might boost their mood, memory and concentration, the survey suggested.
The findings, published online July 23 in the journal Menopause, stem from a Mayo Clinic poll of more than 1,800 menopausal women conducted between 2005 and 2011. Symptoms were compared between caffeine users and nonusers.

Read more - HERE

MenoMoJoTV - find yours, follow us (@MenoMoJoTV) for daily updates on new videos supporting you & your menopause - Advice, support & guidance. A joint initiative by The Women's Sports Network in partnership with Menopause Matters magazine (@menomatters) supporting women in being more ACTIVE during their menopause.

Your Video on @MMTV - Free to our 100k followers!!

If you would like your MenoVideo to appear on MMTV – please submit a link to Katie on info@wsnet.co.uk and we will distribute it to our 100k followers at no charge.

 

 

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
17 Dec

#Menopause&SPORT - Stretching through Menopause with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

10:00 - Stretching you and your menopause

17:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

<ahref='https://www.freepik.com/photos/woman'>Woman photo created by freepik - www.freepik.com</a>

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
18 Dec

#MenoMoJo ♀VIDEO - Coping with the Menopause by being ACTIVE with .@MenoandMe

12:30 Join Jane Dowling & Dr Renee - as they chat exercise and MenoMojo

19:30

Jane Dowling and Dr Renee talk about menopausal exercise and HRT

This week Dr Renee meets menopause blogger and life coach, Jane Dowling. She is a clinical exercise practitioner and menopause advocate. Her blog offer's advice and can be found at www.menoandme.com. Jane regularly shares great advice on her popular Instagram page @menoandme .

Here they discuss the many benefits of exercise in menopause, impacting on bone, heart and brain health as well as improving mental health. Jane runs frequent Menopause Day's - more info here - menoandme.com. 

Come along to meet others embroiled in the menopause, listen to inspirational speakers including Jane Lewis talking vagina's, Dr Renee on menopause & HRT and Jane talking exercise. On the day join the fun and simple exercise that will be at everyone's level. There will be snack and a goody bag.

Ted Talk:

This is the Ted Talk Jane mentioned. https://youtu.be/BHY0FxzoKZE

MenoMoJoTV - find yours, follow us (@MenoMoJoTV) for daily updates on new videos supporting you & your menopause - Advice, support & guidance. A joint initiative by The Women's Sports Network in partnership with Menopause Matters magazine (@menomatters) supporting women in being more ACTIVE during their menopause.

Your Video on @MMTV - Free to our 100k followers!!

If you would like your MenoVideo to appear on MMTV – please submit a link to Katie on info@wsnet.co.uk and we will distribute it to our 100k followers at no charge.

 

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live
20 Dec

#Menopause&SPORT - Focus on flexibility & mobility with weights with Katie Morris @menomatters @WSNet

10:00 - Mobility is key to movement, menopause & weight loss

13:00

Three types of exercise for you menopause - cardio vascular, resistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch

Exercise, sport and generally keeping active are important for women of all ages.  As we face menopause and all the associated hormonal changes – maintaining our ‘core’ can make a world of difference as to how we enjoy this phase of our lives.

Your core is key to all movement skills – it builds your ‘mojo’ – and is what all athletes rely on for effective sporting movements. It also underlies a range of issues which occur after middle age; poor posture, stability, digestion, balance, back pain, muscle loss, osteoporosis, flexibility, urinary leakage, heart health, falls prevention, breathing etc. These all become intrinsically linked during menopause. If one declines they all start to ‘gang up’ often to a point of being overbearing.

It’s the suite of muscles which connect the upper and lower parts of your frame. It holds, protects and stabilises organs and helps with balance, breathing and stability. Think of it like a disposable coffee cup. Your pelvic floor is the cup bottom, the abdominals/obliques (tummy muscles) are the walls of the cup and your diaphragm sits on top like a lid. If  those muscles aren’t working in unison the core becomes wobbly – just like a coffee cup – until you press the lid on. Then it becomes ridged  . . . and wont leak!

Posture & stability - falling over is the most common cause of non-fatal injury in women. Loss of estrogen weakens muscles and it can affect the inner ears, which assist our sense of balance.

Better balance - Incontinence often occurs during menopause. Keeping your core strong provides better balance and helps distribute pressure evenly including when your bladder is full. Tai Chi, yoga, and basic balance exercises can help you get stronger, be more in control of your movements, and be in better balance.

Breathing - also plays a role here. Poor (shallow) breathing can negatively impact control of your pelvic floor. Engaging your diaphragm (the 'lid') to breath improves proprioception - part of the body’s balance system that communicates between core and pelvic muscle to help balance.

How do I choose? – consider three elements; cardiovascularresistance (load bearing) and flex & stretch. Try to get a bit of each element in whichever activity you choose to do. We rank sports/activities in our MenoMoJo manual under those three elements. Overall aim for 2-3 hours of moderate aerobic activity each week.

Enjoy – most important choose exercise that you will enjoy and feel euphoric about achieving. Be aware of your target heart rate and track intensity using the ‘talk test’ – you should be able to talk and breath comfortably whilst ‘working out’.  If you suffer from osteoporosis avoid high impact aerobics or activities where a fall is likely. Always talk to you medical practitioner before any major change in your exercise routines.

The role of exercise in abating many symptoms such as hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. But, exercising beyond menopause is still the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification – so embrace it.

Follow @Meno_MoJo on Twitter and find more information in our FREE MenoMoJo - magazine  - http://wsnet.co.uk/menomojo-magazine

Photo credit (C) Ben Lister

Follow @WSNTVi on Twitter for updates on ALL WSN-TV On-Screen programmes.

Watch Live

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